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Information about the people behind Einstein Online - from the editorial team and our authors to the scientific advisory council.

Publisher

Einstein-Online is published by the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute) in Potsdam, Germany.

Editorial board

Elke Müller (supervising editor)

is research coordinator at the Albert Einstein Institut. She is responsible for all organizational issues regarding the Einstein Online website.

Markus Pössel

is the managing scientist of the Center for Astronomy Education and Outreach at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. During his time at the Albert Einstein Institute, he created the Einstein Online website as one of the institute's contributions to the World Year of Physics 2005 (Einstein year). He has written the introduction Elementary Einstein, the relativistic dictionary, numerous spotlights on relativity as well as creating all original texts, translations and images for which no explicit source is given.

Screen design and programming

Jan Scharein

joined Einstein Online early in 2006, and is responsible for the maintenance and web programming on Einstein Online - part of his responsibilities as web programmer for the Max Planck Campus in Golm/Potsdam, where the Albert Einstein Institute is situated.

Authors

Peter Aufmuth

works as a scientist at the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover and the University of Hannover, where he is involved in the maintenance and development of the gravitational wave detector GEO600. His contributions to Einstein-Online are the spotlight topics Catching the wave with light, Small vibrations and LISA - hunting waves in space.

Carsten Aulbert

is a scientist at the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover. During his time as a graduate student in the astrophysics group of the Albert Einstein Institute in Potsdam, where he searched for gravitational and radio waves from quickly rotating neutron stars, he co-authored the spotlight text Listening posts around the globe.

Martin Barstow

is a professor of astrophysics and space science at the University of Leicester. His research interests are hot white dwarfs, the interstellar medium, and the development and operation of detectors for observing these astronomical objects. He is a co-author (with V. Trimble) of the spotlight text Gravitational redshift and White Dwarf stars.

Matthias Bartelmann

is professor for theoretical physics at the Center for Astronomy of Heidelberg University. His research is concerned with what galaxy clusters, gravitational lensing and the cosmic background radiation can tell us about cosmic structure formation. For Einstein Online, he has written the spotlight text Cosmic sound, and he is also a member of Einstein Online's Scientific Advisory Board.

Martin Bojowald

is an Associate Professor of Physics at Penn State University, where his research is concerned with cosmological applications of loop quantum gravity. More details can be found in the spotlight topics he wrote for Einstein Online, Avoiding the big bang and Taming infinity with loops, during his time as a staff scientist at Albert Einstein Institute.

Carl H. Brans

is J. C. Carter Emeritus Professor of Theoretical Physics at Loyola University in New Orleans. He is one of the co-inventors of Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory, an extension of general relativity, which he has described in the Einstein Online spotlight text Varying Newton's Constant.  More recently he has been involved in investigations of the physical significance of recent exotic discoveries in the subfield of mathematics known as differential topology.

Marco Cavaglià

is an assistant professor of physics at the University of Mississippi. His research interests are quantum gravity and cosmology, including the intriguing possibility that particle accelerators might produce miniature black holes - which is also the topic of his contribution to Einstein Online, the spotlight text Particle accelerators as black hole factories?

Piotr Chrusciel

is professor of gravitational physics at the University of Vienna.. His research covers a wide range of mathematical topics related to Einstein's equations, from the classification of black holes and cosmic censorship to the definition of mass in general relativity. During his time at the Laboratory for Mathematics and Theoretical Physics of Université de Tours he has written for Einstein Online the spotlight topics How many kinds of (stable) black hole? and The many ways of building an empty model universe.

Virginia Dippel

was a graduate student in the quantum gravity group at Albert Einstein Institute in Potsdam from 2004 to 2005. For Einstein Online, she wrote the spotlight topic Simplicity in higher dimensions.

José Antonio Font

is an associate professor of physics at the University of Valencia. His research interests are numerical relativistic (magneto)-hydrodynamics and numerical relativity. His contribution to Einstein Online is the spotlight text The realm of relativistic hydrodynamics.

David Garfinkle

is a professor of physics at Oakland University. His main research interest is numerical relativity, in particular the simulation of spacetime in the vicinity of singularities. He describes some of his results in the spotlight text Of singularities and breadmaking.

Robert H. Gowdy

is an Associate Professor of Physics at Virginia Commonwealth University. His main research interest is in the geometrical properties of spacetimes that follow from Einstein's equations. His contribution to Einstein Online is the spotlight text Of gravitational waves and spherical chickens describing a family of spacetimes explored by him and, since, by many others.

Ute Kraus

is professor of physics at Hildesheim University.  Her research interests range from the physics of accreting pulsars to the visualization and didactic aspects of relativity theory. Visualization is also the key ingredient of her Einstein Online contribution, authored while she was employed by Albert Einstein Institute, Potsdam, and a member of the Theoretical Astrophysics group at Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen: the spotlight topic Descent into a black hole.

Badri Krishnan

is a senior scientist in the astrophysics group at Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover, were he participates in the data analysis for the gravitational wave detectors GEO 600 and LIGO. His research interests also include the fundamental physics of black holes. He is a co-author of the spotlight topic Listening posts around the globe, written during his time at Albert Einstein Institut in Potsdam.

Andrzej Krolak

is a staff member at the Institute of Mathematics of the Polish Academy of Sciences. His area of research encompasses gravitation and general relativity. Currently, the focus of professor Krolak's work is on the analysis of data obtained by gravitational wave detectors.

Bernhard List

was a graduate student in the geometric analysis group at Albert Einstein Institute in Potsdam between 2003 and 2006. His research concerned the geometry of curved spaces - including, but not restricted to those occuring in general relativity. His Einstein Online contribution is the spotlight topic Einstein and soap bubbles.

Jorma Louko

is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at the University of Nottingham. His main research interest is quantum gravity, including quantum cosmology, about which he has written the spotlight text Searching for the quantum beginning of the universe.

Bernd Machenschalk

is a computer scientist at the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover, where he works on the data analysis of the gravitational wave detectors LIGO and GEO600. He is a major contributor to the Einstein@Home project. During his time at the Albert Einstein Institute in Potsdam he was, unsurprisingly, co-author of the spotlight topic Einstein@Home - gravitational waves for everybody.

Andreas Müller

is Scientific Coordinator of the Cluster of excellence "Universe" at the Technische Universität München in Garching near Munich, in Germany.  He is the author of the spotlight topics Luminous disks: How black holes light up their surroundings and Active black holes: Ultra-hot cosmic beacons, which he wrote during his time as post-doctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, where he was doing research on black holes and the diverse astronomical phenomena for which they are responsible.

Reinhard Prix

is a scientist at the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover. His research interests include neutron stars and the detection of gravitational waves. He is one of the developers of the Einstein@Home project; fittingly, he is co-author of our spotlight topic Einstein@Home - gravitational waves for everybody, written during his time as a post-doctoral researcher in the astrophysics group at Albert Einstein Institute in Potsdam.

Alan Rendall

is a scientist in the geometric analysis and gravitation research group at Albert Einstein Institute. His main research interest is mathematical cosmology. His contribution to Einstein Online is the spotlight The mathematical universe.

Tilman Sauer

is Senior Scientific Editor of the Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, the Einstein Papers Project at the California Institute of Technology. His main research interest are Einstein's writings about relativity and his unified field theories. His contribution to Einstein Online is the spotlight text A brief history of gravitational lenses.

Irwin Shapiro

is the Timken University Professor at Harvard University and a Senior Scientist of the Smithsonian Institution. He works at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. His research interests involve applications of radio and radar techniques to problems in geophysics, planetary physics, and astrophysics. He also devised and carried out precision tests of general relativity within our solar system; his contribution to Einstein Online is the spotlight text Gravitational deflection of light (with S. Shapiro).

Steven Shapiro

is an Associate Professor of Physics and Associate Academic Dean at Guilford College in Greensboro, NC. His research interests are in the dynamics of the Earth's upper mantle, seismology, and, most recently, precision measurements of light deflection near the sun. For Einstein Online, he has written the spotlight text Gravitational deflection of light (with I. Shapiro).

Lee Smolin

is a long-term researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, and an adjoint professor at the University of Waterloo. His main research interest is in quantum gravity, with a particular focus on loop quantum gravity. His contribution to Einstein Online is the spotlight topic Actors on a changing stage: quantum gravity and background independence.

Rafael D. Sorkin

is professor of physics at Syracuse University, New York State, and a visiting researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada. His current research centers on the causal set hypothesis as the basis of a theory of quantum gravity; consequently, his contribution to Einstein Online is the spotlight topic Geometry from Order: Causal Sets.

Stefan Theisen

is a scientist at Albert Einstein Institute, where he carries out research on string theory. His contributions to Einstein Online are the spotlight topics extra dimensionen - and how to hide them, The embedded universe and The hunt for extra dimensions. In addition, he serves as a member of Einstein Online's Scientific Advisory Board.

Thomas Thiemann

is a professor of physics at Erlangen University. His research is concerned with all aspects of loop quantum gravity. His contribution to Einstein Online, the spotlight The fabric of space, was written while he was a scientist at the Albert Einstein Institute and an Associate Professor at the University of Waterloo in Canada. He is a member of the scientific advisory board of Einstein Online.

Virginia Trimble

is a professor of physics at the University of California, Irvine, and staff astronomer at Las Cumbres Observatory. Her research interests are the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the universe, and of the communities of scientists who study them. For Einstein Online, she has revisited research from her days as a graduate student with the spotlight text Gravitational redshift and white dwarfs (co-authored with M. Barstow).

Claes Uggla

is a professor of theoretical physics at Karlstad University. His current main research interest is the physical applications and mathematical features of general relativity, from how the properties of matter influence spacetime geometry to how strong spacetime curvature affects matter, and spacetime itself. For Einstein Online, he has written a spotlight text dealing with one of the most disturbing features of Einstein's theory of gravity: Spacetime singularities.

Achim Weiss

is a scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching near Munich, in Germany. His main area of research is stellar physics. One part of his work concerns the evolution of Lithium-plateau stars, which is important for observational tests of the predictions of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. To Einstein Online, he has contributed the spotlight texts Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Equilibrium and Change, and Elements of the past.

Scientific Advisory Board

The members of the scientific advisory board are responsible for quality assurance on Einstein Online. They review all new material that is added to the website. In addition, they suggest new "spotlights on relativity" and suitable authors.

Matthias Bartelmann

is professor for theoretical physics at the Center for Astronomy of Heidelberg University. His research is concerned with what galaxy clusters, gravitational lensing and the cosmic background radiation can tell us about cosmic structure formation.

Alan Rendall

is a scientist in the geometric analysis and gravitation research group at Albert Einstein Institute. His main research interest is mathematical cosmology.

Albrecht Rüdiger
is a scientist at the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover, where he takes part in constructing and improving the gravitational wave detector GEO600.
Bernard Schutz
is a director at the Albert Einstein Institute in Golm. His main research interest is in the physics and detection of gravitational waves.
Stefan Theisen
is a scientist at Albert Einstein Institute, where he carries out research on string theory.
Thomas Thiemann

is a professor of physics at Erlangen University. His research is concerned with all aspects of loop quantum gravity.

Special thanks to...

Marilyn Daily for her invaluable editorial work on the English version of Elementary Einstein; Badri Krishnan and Dennis Pollney for their help with English translations; Luciano Rezzolla for acting as a reviewer; Susanne Milde and the kind people of Milde Marketing Science Communication for their support with public relations.

The IT department at Albert Einstein Institute for their continuing support of this website.

Einstein Online will always remember Jürgen Ehlers (1929-2008), who was the founding director of Albert Einstein Institute in Potsdam. His research covered a diversity of aspects of general relativity. His continued support and advice have been invaluable for making this web portal what it is. Further information, including an obituary, can be found here.

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