Detecting gravitational waves

More about gravitational wave detectors on earth and in space

Climate research with gravitational wave technology

The two GRACE Follow-On satellites have been measuring the Earth’s gravitational field since mid-2018 to obtain important data for geophysics and climate research. On board is a laser interferometer that will serve as a model for future satellite missions and represents a step toward the LISA gravitational wave observatory.

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Gravitational wave detectors find 56 potential cosmic collisions

During collaborative measurement campaigns, so-called observation runs, the worldwide gravitational wave detector network listens for signals from space. During the third observation run “O3”, which started on April 1st, 2019, the LIGO detectors (USA), Virgo (Italy), and GEO600 (Germany) recorded a range of promising signals.

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Listening posts around the globe

Overview of the gravitational wave detectors currently operational, or under construction

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Einstein@Home – gravitational waves for everybody

Information on how you personally can help with the search for gravitational wave – by donating processing time on your private computer

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Catching the wave with light

Some information on how interferometric detectors such as LIGO or GEO600 work

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Small vibrations

Some information on how the vintage models among gravitational wave detectors work – resonant detectors

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LISA – Hunting waves in space

Information about the latest version of the most ambitious gravitational wave project – a detector in space

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Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

Albert Einstein predicted their existence back in 1916, and on 14 September 2015 they were directly detected for the first time: Gravitational waves. Two large interferometric detectors of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration with major contributions from German researchers detected the signal known as “GW150914”. The waves originate from the merger of two black holes and are the first direct observation of these exotic objects.

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Interferometric gravitational wave detectors

All modern gravitational wave detectors are based on the principle of a Michelson interferometer. But how exactly does it work?

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